Professor Angela Creese

Professor in Education

Education Stirling

Professor Angela Creese

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About me

About me

I am Professor of Linguistic Ethnography in the Faculty of Social Sciences. I gained my PhD in Educational Linguistics from the University of Pennsylvania, a programme which combined sociolinguistics, linguistic anthropology, classroom discourse, second language acquisition and language policy/planning. These areas continue to shape my study of language in social life. I started my academic career as a research assistant working on others' funded projects. This trajectory has created a commitment to collaborative research, particularly in large diverse, interdisciplinary research teams. Over the last four years I have served as the principal investigator on two research projects. The first, 'Translation and translanguaging: Investigating linguistic and cultural transformations in superdiverse wards in four UK cities' (TLANG) (https://tlang.org.uk/), was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC). This project involved 6 collaborating universities and eight non- academic stakeholders, comprising 33 team members. The project’s overarching question was: ‘How do people communicate in contexts of linguistic and social diversity?’. The second project, also funded by the AHRC through its Global Challenges Research Fund, investigated the potential of translanguaging as a decolonizing pedagogy in South African university classrooms. The project was a collaboration with colleagues at the University of Cape Town (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qzLD1s6Bes&feature=youtu.be).

I am interested in recruiting doctoral students in the following areas: multilingualism, every day interactions in social life, language and ideology.

Research (3)

My disciplinary home is interpretive sociolinguistics, and I draw on theories and methodologies from linguistic anthropology to investigate language in social life. My recent work is on heteroglossia, translanguaging and superdiversity as ideological orientations to social and linguistic diversity. My research draws on empirical data gained through ethnographic observations and audio and video recordings of everyday interactions. I have collected data in schools, markets, libraries, sport halls, community centres and universities. I work with a range of stakeholders beyond the academy, including arts, heritage, cultural and education organizations.

Projects

Ethics and Aesthetics of Encountering the Other: New Frameworks for Living with Difference
PI: Professor Angela Creese
Funded by: Arts and Humanities Research Council

GCRF Development Award: Languaging in post-conflict zones: Educating for success in Colombia, Lebanon and South Africa
PI: Professor Angela Creese
Funded by: Arts and Humanities Research Council

Languaging in Times of Change
PI: Professor Angela Creese
Funded by: Delegates - Conferences

Outputs (60)

Outputs

Book Chapter

Blackledge A & Creese A (2020) Heteroglossia. In: Tusting K (ed.) The Routledge Handbook of Linguistic Ethnography. Routledge Handbooks in Applied Linguistics. Routledge, pp. 97-108. https://www.routledge.com/The-Routledge-Handbook-of-Linguistic-Ethnography/Tusting/p/book/9781138938168

Book Chapter

Blackledge A & Creese A (2017) Translanguaging in mobility. In: Canagarajah S (ed.) The Routledge Handbook of Migration and Language. London: Taylor & Francis, pp. 31-46. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315754512

Book Chapter

Creese A (2017) Translanguaging as an everyday practice. In: Paulsrud B, Rosén J, Straszer B & Wedin Å (eds.) New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education. Bilingual Education & Bilingualism, 108. Bristol: Channel View Publications, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.21832/PAULSR7814

Book Chapter

Blackledge A, Creese A & Hu R (2017) Everyday encounters in the marketplace: Translanguaging in the super-diverse city. In: De Fina A, Ikizoglu D & Wegner J (eds.) Diversity and Super-Diversity: Sociocultural linguistic perspectives. Washington D.C.: Georgetown University Law Center, pp. 97-116. http://press.georgetown.edu/book/languages/diversity-and-super-diversity

Book Chapter

Creese A, Takhi JK & Blackledge A (2016) Reflexivity in team ethnography: Using researcher vignettes. In: Martin-Jones M & Martin D (eds.) Researching Multilingualism: Critical and ethnographic perspectives. London: Taylor & Francis, pp. 203-214. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315405346

Book Chapter

Copland F & Creese A (2016) Ethical issues in linguistic ethnography: Balancing the micro and the macro. In: De Costa P (ed.) Ethics in applied linguistics research: Language researcher narratives. Second Language Acquisition Research Series. New York: Routledge, pp. 161-178. https://www.routledge.com/Ethics-in-Applied-Linguistics-Research-Language-Researcher-Narratives/De-Costa/p/book/9780415739061; https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315816937

Book Chapter

Blackledge A & Creese A (2015) Emblems of identities in four European urban settings. In: Nortier J & Svendsen BA (eds.) Language, Youth and Identity in the 21st Century: Linguistic Practices across Urban Spaces. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 167-182. https://www.cambridge.org/core/books/language-youth-and-identity-in-the-21st-century/C1D52D2D7A8B016233BEE9192F8885FE; https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139061896.012

Book Chapter

Conteh J, Copland F & Creese A (2014) Multilingual teachers’ resources in three different contexts: empowering learning. In: Conteh J & Meier G (eds.) The Multilingual Turn in Languages Education: Opportunities and Challenges. New Perspectives on Language and Education. Bristol: Multilingual Matters, pp. 158-178. http://www.multilingual-matters.com/display.asp?K=9781783092222

Book Chapter

Blackledge A, Creese A & Takhi JK (2013) Language, superdiversity and education. In: de Saint-Georges I & Weber J (eds.) Multilingualism and Multimodality. The Future of Education Research. The Future of Education Research, 3. Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, pp. 59-80. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-6209-266-2_4

Book Chapter

Blackledge A, Creese A & Takhi JK (2013) Beyond multilingualism: Heteroglossia in practice. In: May S (ed.) The Multilingual Turn: Implications for SLA, TESOL, and Bilingual Education. New York: Taylor & Francis, pp. 191-215. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203113493

Article

Hornberger NH & Creese A (2012) A Note from the Editors. Anthropology and Education Quarterly, 43 (2), pp. 127-127. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1548-1492.2012.01164.x

Book Chapter

Blackledge A & Creese A (2012) Negotiation of identities across times and spaces. In: Gardner S & Martin-Jones M (eds.) Multilingualism, Discourse, and Ethnography. New York: Taylor & Francis, pp. 82-94. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203143179

Book Chapter

Creese A (2011) Making local practices globally relevant in researching multilingual education. In: Hult FM & King KA (eds.) Educational Linguistics in Practice: Applying the Local Globally and the Global Locally. Bilingual Education & Bilingualism. Bristol: Channel View Publications, pp. 41-55. http://www.multilingual-matters.com/display.asp?K=9781847693525

Book Chapter

Creese A (2010) Teaching approaches in two-teacher classrooms. In: Leung C & Creese A (eds.) English as an Additional Language: Approaches to Teaching Linguistic Minority Students. London: SAGE Publications, pp. 58-74. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446251454.n5

Article

Arkoudis S & Creese A (2006) Introduction. International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, 9 (4), pp. 411-414. https://doi.org/10.2167/beb341.0

Book Chapter

Creese A (2005) Mediating allegations of racism in a multiethnic London school: What speech communities and communities of practice can tell us about discourse and power. In: Barton D & Tusting K (eds.) Beyond Communities of Practice: Language Power and Social Context. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 55-76. https://doi.org/10.1017/CBO9780511610554.005

Research centres/groups