Skip header navigation

£190,000 project to tackle sea lice and other agents of salmon disease

Back to news

The University of Stirling is working with an aquaculture firm on a new £190,000 project designed to tackle sea lice and other diseases of farmed salmon.

Stirling’s Institute of Aquaculture and Pulcea Ltd have received funding from Innovate UK for a three-year Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP), aimed at improving the efficacy of medicinal treatments in the Atlantic salmon farming industry.

The work will see a new university post created at Pulcea’s base in the University of Stirling’s Innovation Park, with the successful candidate supervised by Professor James Bron, of the Institute of Aquaculture, and Ian Jamieson, of Pulcea.

The new post, Aquaculture Veterinarian, offers an excellent opportunity for graduates to launch their careers or for health professionals to continue their careers in a business context. 

Professor James Bron

Professor Bron said: “I warmly welcome this Knowledge Transfer Partnership with Pulcea and look forward to working with the successful candidate.

“The new post, Aquaculture Veterinarian, offers an excellent opportunity for graduates to launch their careers or for health professionals to continue their careers in a business context. It would suit a veterinarian or biologist who is keen to work alongside world-renowned scientists, vets and specialists in marine physics and medical devices.”

Sea lice on salmon

Sea lice on salmon.

As the UK’s innovation agency, Innovate UK funds and supports science and technology ideas that grow the economy. The objectives of a KTP are to: facilitate the transfer of knowledge and technology and the spread of technical and business skills; stimulate and enhance business-relevant research and training undertaken by the knowledge base; and provide company-based training for associates to enhance their business and specialist skills.

Pulcea works with a range of international partners to develop and deliver innovative technical solutions to fish health and welfare challenges in aquaculture, utilising a physics-driven and welfare-friendly approach.

The successful candidate should have a recognised veterinary qualification or MSc / PhD level experience in a biological discipline relating to animal health and welfare.

This timely award allows us to undertake the comprehensive work packages required to develop our initial research and put it to commercial use.

Ian Armstrong

Ian Armstrong, Pulcea’s Managing Director, said: “We are extremely grateful to the UK and Scottish Governments for their ongoing support for our innovative start-up company.

“This timely award allows us to undertake the comprehensive work packages required to develop our initial research, sponsored by the Scottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre, and put it to commercial use.

“It provides further confirmation of the benefits of being based here at the University of Stirling Innovation Park, where we are surrounded by like-minded companies, all of which are in close proximity to the Institute of Aquaculture, which will soon be benefitting from £17 million of City Regional funding.

“Scotland has a proud history of innovation and Pulcea’s ambition is to become part of that tradition.”

You may also be interested in

Ambassador to outline Slovakia’s key anniversaries in Stirling talk

Ambassador to outline Slovakia’s key anniversaries in Stirling talk

Read more
Digital design should embed ethical and political values

Digital design should embed ethical and political values

Read more
Establishing responsibility for the impacts of climate change

Establishing responsibility for the impacts of climate change

Read more
Scroll back to the top