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Article

The benefits and hazards of exploiting vegetative regeneration for forest conservation management in a warming world

Citation
Sjolund MJ & Jump A (2013) The benefits and hazards of exploiting vegetative regeneration for forest conservation management in a warming world. Forestry, 86 (5), pp. 503-513. https://doi.org/10.1093/forestry/cpt030

Abstract
Forest management practices in European temperate and Mediterranean regions have frequently exploited coppicing and pollarding - two silvicultural techniques that promote vegetative regeneration. These practices were historically very common with trees being cut at ground level or above the level of browsing to produce shoots, which were harvested for a variety of uses. Many habitats created from such traditional management are now recognized as areas of high conservation value, being rich in biodiversity. Yet their persistence has been under threat after these practices suffered a decline in the nineteenth century. The focus of this review is to synthesize information on coppicing and pollarding from the ecosystem to the molecular level and to highlight characteristics that may help or hinder climate adaptation. Understanding the benefits and hazards of exploiting vegetative regeneration is the first step in assessing whether promoting this means of reproduction could be exploited for conservation by increasing forest persistence in unfavourable future climate conditions. Practical management recommendations are given and suggestions are made for future research.

Journal
Forestry: Volume 86, Issue 5

StatusPublished
Author(s)Sjolund, M Jennifer; Jump, Alistair
FundersNatural Environment Research Council
Publication date31/12/2013
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/18636
PublisherOxford University Press
ISSN0015-752X
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