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Article

Can Taxation contribute to sustainable management of the bushmeat trade? Evidence from Gabon and Cameroon

Citation
Wilkie DS, Starkey M, Bennett EL, Abernethy K, Fotso R, Maisels F & Elkan P (2006) Can Taxation contribute to sustainable management of the bushmeat trade? Evidence from Gabon and Cameroon. Journal of International Wildlife Law and Policy, 9 (4), pp. 335-349. https://doi.org/10.1080/13880290601039287

Abstract
First paragraph: Throughout most of Central Africa, subsistence hunting of non-protected wildlife species outside of protected areas is legal and in principle highly regulated. In law, each nation specifies: a) which wildlife species are protected and thus should not be hunted; b) when during the year hunting is allowed; and c) what techniques and weapons can be used for hunting. Moreover, most if not all countries require hunters, including subsistence hunters, to purchase both gun and hunting permits, and to limit the number of animals that are harvested. In Gabon, for example, each time a hunter kills an animal, he must record it in the book that accompanies the hunting license and pay a harvest fee to the government. Trading of harvested wildlife (bushmeat) is also in principle regulated. However, in practice, these laws, like those on hunting, are rarely enforced, even in and around protected areas.

Journal
Journal of International Wildlife Law and Policy: Volume 9, Issue 4

StatusPublished
Author(s)Wilkie, David S; Starkey, Malcolm; Bennett, Elizabeth L; Abernethy, Katharine; Fotso, Roger; Maisels, Fiona; Elkan, Paul
Publication date31/12/2006
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/21005
PublisherTaylor and Francis
ISSN1388-0292
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