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Article

Understanding the legacy of widespread population translocations on the post-glacial genetic 2 structure of the European beech, Fagus sylvatica L.

Citation
Sjolund MJ, Gonzalez Diaz P, Moreno-Villena JJ & Jump A (2017) Understanding the legacy of widespread population translocations on the post-glacial genetic 2 structure of the European beech, Fagus sylvatica L.. Journal of Biogeography, 44 (11), pp. 2475-2487. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13053

Abstract
Aim  Human impacts have shaped species ranges throughout the Holocene. The putative native range of beech, Fagus sylvatica, in Britain was obscured by its late post-glacial arrival and subsequent extensive management. We sought to differentiate the interacting effects of post-glacial colonization and anthropic impacts on the current genetic structure and diversity of beech by contrasting phylogeographic signals from putatively natural and translocated populations.  Location  Samples were obtained from 42 sites throughout Great Britain.  Methods  Chloroplast and nuclear microsatellite marker data were interpreted alongside palynological, historical and anecdotal evidence. Genetic structure was analysed using individual-based Bayesian assignment methods and colonization history was analysed using an approximate Bayesian computation framework.  Results  Phylogeographic patterns suggested contemporary forests originated from putative native south-eastern populations. High haplotypic diversity was found near the entry point of beech into Britain. Cryptic signals of isolation-by-distance persisted in the putative native range, together with higher levels of gene diversity in nuclear markers. Weak regional nuclear genetic structure suggested high levels of contemporary gene flow throughout the country.  Main conclusions  Genetic patterns driven by natural colonization persist despite widespread anthropic intervention. Forests in northerly regions were established from forests in the putative native range, diminishing the credibility of any present boundary between the native and non-native range of beech in Britain.

Keywords
Anthropogenic; Britain; colonization; Fagus sylvatica; gene flow; microsatellites; phylogeography; post-glacial

Journal
Journal of Biogeography: Volume 44, Issue 11

StatusPublished
Author(s)Sjolund, M Jennifer; Gonzalez Diaz, Patricia; Moreno-Villena, Jose J; Jump, Alistair
FundersNatural Environment Research Council
Publication date30/11/2017
Publication date online04/07/2017
Date accepted by journal20/04/2017
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/25337
Related URLshttp://hdl.handle.net/11667/90;
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
ISSN0305-0270
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