Article

Early nutritional intervention can improve utilisation of vegetable-based diets in diploid and triploid Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.)

Citation

Clarkson M, Migaud H, Metochis C, Vera L, Leeming D, Tocher DR & Taylor J (2017) Early nutritional intervention can improve utilisation of vegetable-based diets in diploid and triploid Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.). British Journal of Nutrition, 118 (1), pp. 17-29. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114517001842

Abstract
The present study investigated nutritional programming in Atlantic salmon to improve utilisation of a vegetable-based diet. At first exogenous feeding, fry were fed either a marine-based diet (Diet Mstimulus, 80% fishmeal (FM)/4% fish oil (FO)) or a vegetable-based diet (Diet Vstimulus, 10% FM/0% FO) for 3 weeks. Subsequently, all fish were then fed under the same conditions with a commercial, marine-based, diet for 15 weeks and thereafter challenged with a second V diet (Diet Vchallenge, 10% FM/0% FO) for 6 weeks. Diploid and triploid siblings were run in parallel to examine ploidy effects. Growth performance, feed intake, nutrient utilisation and intestinal morphology were monitored. Fish initially given Diet Vstimulus (V-fish) showed 24 % higher growth rate and 23 % better feed efficiency compared with M-fish when later challenged with Diet Vchallenge. There was no difference in feed intake between nutritional histories, but increased nutrient retentions highlighted the improved utilisation of a V diet in V-fish. There were generally few significant effects of nutritional history or ploidy on enteritis scores in the distal intestine after the challenge phase as only V-triploids showed a significant increase (P

Keywords
Atlantic salmon: Nutritional programming: Lipids: EPA: DHA: Vegetable raw material

Journal
British Journal of Nutrition: Volume 118, Issue 1

StatusPublished
FundersEuropean Commission, Biomar Ltd, Marine Harvest (Scotland) Ltd and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Publication date31/07/2017
Publication date online31/07/2017
Date accepted by journal21/06/2017
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/25669
PublisherCambridge University Press
ISSN0007-1145
eISSN1475-2662