Article

Alcohol Packaging As a Promotional Tool: A Focus Group Study With Young Adult Drinkers in Scotland

Details

Citation

Jones D, Moodie C, Purves RI, Fitzgerald N & Crockett R (2022) Alcohol Packaging As a Promotional Tool: A Focus Group Study With Young Adult Drinkers in Scotland. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 83 (4), pp. 565-573. https://doi.org/10.15288/jsad.2022.83.565

Abstract
Objective: Little research has been conducted on consumer perceptions of alcohol packaging as a marketing tool. The aim of this study was to explore how young adults view and engage with alcohol packaging. Method: Eight focus groups were conducted in Glasgow (Scotland) with current drinkers (n = 50), segmented by age (18–24, 25–35), gender (female, male), and social grade (ABC1, C2DE). Participants were shown, allowed to handle, and asked about a range of alcoholic products. Results: Five main themes emerged from the data. The first was the ubiquity of alcohol packaging, with frequent exposure reported in different settings, such as shops and drinking venues, and via marketing. The second was appeal, with pack graphics (e.g., color), structure (e.g., shape, size), and promotions (e.g., gifts, limited editions) allowing alcohol packs to catch attention, enabling products to stand out on shelves, and helping to create product and brand liking, interest, and choice. Third, alcohol packaging was frequently associated with specific occasions and activities. Fourth, alcohol packaging informed perceptions of product-consumer targeting, suitability, and intended drinker profiles. Fifth, alcohol packaging also engaged nonvisual senses (e.g., touch, sound, smell), guiding expectations of product taste and palatability. Conclusions: For young adult drinkers in Scotland, alcohol packaging can capture attention, create appeal, and help shape perceptions of the product, drinker, and drinking experience.

Journal
Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs: Volume 83, Issue 4

StatusPublished
FundersAlcohol Focus Scotland
Publication date31/07/2022
Publication date online31/07/2022
Date accepted by journal12/02/2022
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/34528
ISSN1937-1888

People (5)

People

Dr Rachel Crockett
Dr Rachel Crockett

Lecturer, Psychology

Professor Niamh Fitzgerald
Professor Niamh Fitzgerald

Professor, Institute for Social Marketing

Mr Daniel Jones
Mr Daniel Jones

Research Assistant, Institute for Social Marketing

Dr Crawford Moodie
Dr Crawford Moodie

Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Social Marketing

Dr Richard Purves
Dr Richard Purves

Senior Research Fellow, Institute for Social Marketing