Article

Putting your best fish forward: Investigating distance decay and relative preferences for fish conservation

Citation

Danley B, Sandorf ED & Campbell D (2021) Putting your best fish forward: Investigating distance decay and relative preferences for fish conservation. Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, 108, Art. No.: 102475. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jeem.2021.102475

Abstract
Easily recognizable species are often used as so-called ‘flagship’ species to raise awareness and funding for conservation action, but this practice has been criticized for neglecting low-profile species. One component of biodiversity is the geographic distribution of where species live, with species that live in only one habitat being endemic to that particular habitat. This study investigates how respondents to a discrete choice experiment ascribe value to the conservation of five different fish species with one species being non-endemic to the study area and familiar to most respondents while another, much lesser-known species, is endemic to the study area. We use a latent class model to investigate possible distance decay effects in which species respondents prioritize for economic valuation. Results suggest individuals who live relatively close to unfamiliar species may be among those who are more likely to value such species higher relative to more familiar substitute species.

Keywords
Flagship species; Endemic species; Latent class multinomial logit model; Discrete choice experiment

Journal
Journal of Environmental Economics and Management: Volume 108

StatusPublished
Publication date31/07/2021
Publication date online22/05/2021
Date accepted by journal18/05/2021
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/32628
PublisherElsevier BV
ISSN0095-0696