Conference Paper (unpublished)

The DIAMOND definition of fairness: A more fair transport system by understanding the transport challenges of women

Citation

McQuaid R & Hail Y (2019) The DIAMOND definition of fairness: A more fair transport system by understanding the transport challenges of women. Paper presented at International Transport Demand Management Symposium, 19-21 June 2019, Edinburgh, 19.06.2019-21.06.2019.

Abstract
How do we define fairness in relation to women’s use of and employment in the transport sector? Fairness can be a vague and ambiguous concept which evolves and changes over time and space For DIAMOND the focus is to deliver a fairness definition which is flexible enough to be used across use cases and robust enough to be scientifically valid and reliable. The notion of fairness is closely related to the concepts of justice, equity and human rights and centres on how people are treated or perceived to be treated by others, especially the requirement that they be treated alike, in the absence of significant differences between them. 2. How individuals are treated within a community The terms “fairness” and “justice” both tend to be used to describe how decisions are made and how individuals are treated within a community in a way that is justifiable with regard to the roles they fulfil. However, the many varieties of justice and fairness principles can make it difficult to separate concepts at times. 3. Equality Fairness is also linked to notions of Equality, in particular equality of opportunities (in which job applicants are treated similarly, unhampered by artificial barriers or prejudices or preferences, except when particular distinctions can be explicitly justified i.e. disabled) and equality of outcomes, (people have approximately the same material wealth and income, or in which the general economic conditions of their lives are alike) which can further confuse the view of fairness. However, the concept of fairness is also influenced by its relationship with a variety of justice concepts including: Distributive Justice – which relates to how the benefits and costs/benefits and burdens of transport systems are distributed equitably amongst and between individual groups and communities. Social Justice social - is based on the concepts of human rights and equality, and can be defined as "the way in which human rights are manifested in the everyday lives of people at every level of society". Organisational and procedural Justice – which reflects perceptions of processes that lead to these outcomes. Improving employee outcomes, providing organisational policies and regulations which deliver equality in relation working conditions, salary, home-work balance and the design of a work framework adapted to women. The varieties of justice and fairness principles can make it difficult to separate concepts at times. 4. Procedural Fairness Procedural fairness is concerned with the procedures used by a decision-maker, rather than the actual outcome reached. It requires a fair and proper procedure be used when making a decision. A decision-maker who follows a fair procedure is more likely to reach a fair and correct decision

Keywords
Fairness transport gender

StatusUnpublished
FundersEuropean Commission
Place of publicationEdinburgh
ConferencePaper presented at International Transport Demand Management Symposium, 19-21 June 2019
Conference locationEdinburgh
Dates