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Book Chapter

Cinema against an authoritarian backdrop: A history of Tunisian animation (translation)

Citation
Ben Ayed M (2017) Cinema against an authoritarian backdrop: A history of Tunisian animation (translation). Johnston C (Translator) In: Animation in the Middle East: Practice and Aesthetics from Baghdad to Casablanca. Animation in the Middle East: I.B. Tauris.

Abstract
The internationally acclaimed films Persepolis and Waltz with Bashir only hinted at the vibrant animation culture that exists within the Middle East and North Africa. In spite of censorship, oppression and war, animation studios have thrived in recent years - in Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, Syria and Turkey - giving rise to a whole new generation of entrepreneurs and artists. The success of animation in the Middle East is in part a product of a changing cultural climate, which is increasingly calling for art that reflects politics. Equally, the professionalization and popularization of film festivals and the emergence of animation studios and private initiatives are the results of a growing consumer culture, in which family-friendly entertainment is big business. Animation in the Middle East uncovers the history and politics that have defined the practice and study of animation in the Middle East, and explores the innovative visions of contemporary animators in the region.

Notes
Translation of a chapter by Maya Ben Ayed in an edited collection.

Type of mediaBook (Translated chapter)
StatusPublished
Author(s)Ben Ayed, Maya
TranslatorDr Cristina Johnston
Publication date17/02/2017
PublisherI.B. Tauris
Place of publicationAnimation in the Middle East
ISBN978-1784533267
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