Project

Process Evaluation of Alcohol Brief Interventions in wider settings (Young People and Social Work)

Funded by NHS Health Scotland.

The detection of alcohol problems is known to be enhanced by the use of appropriate screening tools, and a considerable body of research evidence now supports the use of Alcohol Brief Interventions (ABIs) in reducing health-related harm due to alcohol consumption. ABIs are time-limited interventions that focus on changing drinking behaviour, and their delivery has become a significant component of the Scottish Government Alcohol Strategy. Although studies have indicated that ABIs can be effective with adults in primary care settings, relatively little is known about their use and value when implemented in settings such as social work and the community, and with young people (under the age of 16).

This study explored the feasibility and acceptability of ABIs delivered to young people and in social work settings through two phases of research; the first mapping and scoping current projects across Scotland, and the second examining delivery in a series of case study projects, and developing proposals for a potential future outcome evaluation. A mixed methods approach was used involving interviews with project staff and stakeholders and with users of the projects; field visits and observation; and analysis of project documentation and data.

The study was a collaborative project between ISM, Nursing, Midwifery and Health, and the Faculty of Social Sciences.

Publications: https://stirling-research.worktribe.com/record.jx?recordid=530039

https://stirling-research.worktribe.com/record.jx?recordid=975313

Total award value £87,669.00

People

Ms Martine Stead
Ms Martine Stead

Deputy Director of ISM, ISM

Miss Jennifer McKell
Miss Jennifer McKell

Research Fellow 1, Institute for Social Marketing

Mr Douglas Eadie
Mr Douglas Eadie

Research Fellow, Institute for Social Marketing

Professor Tessa Parkes
Professor Tessa Parkes

Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences

Dr Sarah Wilson
Dr Sarah Wilson

Senior Lecturer, Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology