Miss Sophia Daoudi-Simison

PhD Researcher

Psychology University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA

Miss Sophia Daoudi-Simison

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About me

About me

BSc (Hons) Psychology, University of Stirling; (2010). MSc Primate Conservation, Oxford Brookes University; (2011).

Research

Most animal groups contain individuals of just one species, but some live in mixed-species groups. In order to study this there must be clear criteria for determining what constitutes a mixed group. However, providing a standard definition is problematic due to variations in environment/habitat, duration of associations and stability between different taxa. In primatological studies, two or more species are considered to be in a group when individuals of different species are within a certain distance; ≤ 20m or ≤ 50m in the wild, and ≤ 50cm in captivity. Mixed-species groups are commonly reported amongst Neotropical primates, with the most frequently documented between tufted capuchins (Sapajus sp) and squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sp). For this reason, two mixed-species groups of tufted capuchins and squirrel monkeys were housed at the Living Links, RZSS, Edinburgh Zoo. An important contribution of my thesis will be to explore what criteria can be used in determining what constitutes a ‘group’ beyond arbitrary distances, based on social network analysis, behavioural synchrony and evaluating space use. Data will be presented on the two mixed-groups at Living Links, and the wild troops encountered in the Raleighvallen Nature Reserve, Suriname.

Outputs (4)

Outputs

Article

Daoudi S, Badihi G & Buchanan-Smith HM (2017) Is Mixed-Species Living Cognitively Enriching? Enclosure Use and Welfare in Two Captive Groups of Tufted Capuchins (Sapajus apella) and Squirrel Monkeys (Saimiri sciureus). Animal Behavior and Cognition, 4 (1), pp. 51-69. https://doi.org/10.12966/abc.05.02.2017

Article

Buchanan-Smith HM, Griciute J, Daoudi S, Leonardi R & Whiten A (2013) Interspecific interactions and welfare implications in mixed species communities of capuchin (sapajus apella) and squirrel monkeys (saimiri sciureus) over 3 years. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 147 (3-4), pp. 324-333. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applanim.2013.04.004