Article

Drinking patterns vary by gender, age and country-level income: Cross-country analysis of the International Alcohol Control Study

Citation

Chaiyasong S, Huckle T, Mackintosh AM, Meier P, Parry C, Callinan S, Pham C, Kazantseva E, Gray-Phillip G, Parker K & Casswell S (2018) Drinking patterns vary by gender, age and country-level income: Cross-country analysis of the International Alcohol Control Study. Drug and Alcohol Review, 37 (S2), pp. S53-S62. https://doi.org/10.1111/dar.12820

Abstract
Introduction and Aims Gender and age patterns of drinking are important in guiding country responses to harmful use of alcohol. This study undertook cross‐country analysis of drinking across gender, age groups in some high‐and middle‐income countries. Design and Methods Surveys of drinkers were conducted in Australia, England, Scotland, New Zealand, St Kitts and Nevis (high‐income), Thailand, South Africa, Mongolia and Vietnam (middle‐income) as part of the International Alcohol Control Study. Drinking pattern measures were high‐frequency, heavier‐typical quantity and higher‐risk drinking. Differences in the drinking patterns across age and gender groups were calculated. Logistic regression models were applied including a measure of country‐level income. Results Percentages of high‐frequency, heavier‐typical quantity and higher‐risk drinking were greater among men than in women in all countries. Older age was associated with drinking more frequently but smaller typical quantities especially in high‐income countries. Middle‐income countries overall showed less frequent but heavier typical quantities; however, the lower frequencies meant the percentages of higher risk drinkers were lower overall compared with high‐income countries (with the exception of South Africa). Discussion and Conclusions High‐frequency drinking was greater in high‐income countries, particularly in older age groups. Middle‐income countries overall showed less frequent drinking but heavier typical quantities. As alcohol use becomes more normalised as a result of the expansion of commercial alcohol it is likely frequency of drinking will increase with a likelihood of greater numbers drinking at higher risk levels.

Keywords
alcohol consumption; drinking patterns; age; gender; International Alcohol Control (IAC) study

Journal
Drug and Alcohol Review: Volume 37, Issue S2

StatusPublished
Publication date31/08/2018
Publication date online13/06/2018
Date accepted by journal06/05/2018
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/27494
ISSN0959-5236