Book Chapter

Measurement and statistics in ‘organization science’: Philosophical, sociological and historical perspectives

Citation

Zyphur MJ, Pierides DC & Roffe J (2015) Measurement and statistics in ‘organization science’: Philosophical, sociological and historical perspectives. In: Mir R, Willmott H & Greenwood M (eds.) The Routledge Companion to Philosophy in Organization Studies. Routledge Companions in Business, Management and Accounting. Oxford: Routledge, pp. 474-482. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203795248

Abstract
Measurement and statistical practices are ubiquitous across many areas of organization research. For example, in 2012 the Academy of Management Journal had an average of 89 p-values1 in each article (Gigerenzer and Marewski, 2015). Given this prevalence, it is unfortunate that measurement and statistics are usually deployed in ways that ignore their social and material character, instead directing attention to abstract concepts like ‘validity’, ‘truth’, and ‘objectivity’. By focusing on such concepts, researchers remain wedded to unexamined foundational assump - tions with origins in now-antiquated seventeenth century philosophy (see Shapin, 1994, 1996, 2010; Williams, 2005). It is, therefore, unsurprising that existing approaches to measurement and statistics cause problems in contemporary contexts wherein these foundations are difficult to maintain.

Keywords
Economics; Finance; Business & Industry; Humanities;

Journal
The Routledge Companion to Philosophy in Organization Studies

StatusPublished
FundersUniversity of Manchester
Title of seriesRoutledge Companions in Business, Management and Accounting
Publication date31/12/2015
PublisherRoutledge
Place of publicationOxford
ISBN9780415702867
eISBN9780203795248