Skip header navigation

University of Stirling

×

Article

Training paediatric healthcare staff in recognising, understanding and managing conflict with patients and families: findings from a survey on immediate and 6-month impact

Citation
Forbat E, Simons J, Sayer C, Davies M & Barclay S (2017) Training paediatric healthcare staff in recognising, understanding and managing conflict with patients and families: findings from a survey on immediate and 6-month impact. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 102 (3), pp. 250-254. https://doi.org/10.1136/archdischild-2016-310737

Abstract
Background Conflict is a recognised component of healthcare. Disagreements about treatment protocols, treatment aims and poor communication are recognised warning signs. Conflict management strategies can be used to prevent escalation, but are not a routine component of clinical training. Objective To report the findings from a novel training intervention, aimed at enabling paediatric staff to identify and understand the warning signs of conflict, and to implement conflict resolution strategies. Design and setting Self-report measures were taken at baseline, immediately after the training and at 6 months. Questionnaires recorded quantitative and qualitative feedback on the experience of training, and the ability to recognise and de-escalate conflict. The training was provided in a tertiary teaching paediatric hospital in England over 18 months, commencing in June 2013. Intervention A 4-h training course on identifying, understanding and managing conflict was provided to staff. Results Baseline data were collected from all 711 staff trained, and 6-month follow-up data were collected for 313 of those staff (44%). The training was successful in equipping staff to recognise and de-escalate conflict. Six months after the training, 57% of respondents had experienced conflict, of whom 91% reported that the training had enabled them to de-escalate the conflict. Learning was retained at 6 months with staff more able than at baseline recognising conflict triggers (Fischer's exact test, p=0.001) and managing conflict situations (Pearson's χ2 test, p=0.001). Conclusions This training has the potential to reduce substantially the human and economic costs of conflicts for healthcare providers, healthcare staff, patients and relatives.

Journal
Archives of Disease in Childhood: Volume 102, Issue 3

StatusPublished
Author(s)Forbat, Elizabeth; Simons, Jean; Sayer, Charlotte; Davies, Megan; Barclay, Sarah
FundersAardvark TMC
Publication date31/03/2017
Publication date online20/04/2016
Date accepted by journal25/03/2016
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/27300
ISSN0003-9888
eISSN1468-2044
Scroll back to the top