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Article

Two-Phase Resolution of Polyploidy in the Arabidopsis Metabolic Network Gives Rise to Relative and Absolute Dosage Constraints

Citation
Bekaert M, Edger PP, Pires JC & Conant GC (2011) Two-Phase Resolution of Polyploidy in the Arabidopsis Metabolic Network Gives Rise to Relative and Absolute Dosage Constraints. Plant Cell, 23 (5), pp. 1719-1728. https://doi.org/10.1105/tpc.110.081281

Abstract
The abundance of detected ancient polyploids in extant genomes raises questions regarding evolution after whole-genome duplication (WGD). For instance, what rules govern the preservation or loss of the duplicated genes created by WGD? We explore this question by contrasting two possible preservation forces: selection on relative and absolute gene dosages. Constraints on the relative dosages of central network genes represent an important force for maintaining duplicates (the dosage balance hypothesis). However, preservation may also result from selection on the absolute abundance of certain gene products. The metabolic network of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is a powerful system for comparing these hypotheses. We analyzed the surviving WGD-produced duplicate genes in this network, finding evidence that the surviving duplicates from the most recent WGD (WGD-α) are clustered in the network, as predicted by the dosage balance hypothesis. A flux balance analysis suggests an association between the survival of duplicates from a more ancient WGD (WGD-β) and reactions with high metabolic flux. We argue for an interplay of relative and absolute dosage constraints, such that the relative constraints imposed by the recent WGD are still being resolved by evolution, while they have been essentially fully resolved for the ancient event.

Journal
Plant Cell: Volume 23, Issue 5

StatusPublished
Author(s)Bekaert, Michaël; Edger, Patrick P; Pires, J Chris; Conant, Gavin C
Publication date31/05/2011
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/7172
PublisherAmerican Society of Plant Biologists
ISSN1040-4651
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