Skip header navigation

University of Stirling

×

Article

Social learning and human mate preferences: a potential mechanism for generating and maintaining between-population diversity in attraction

Citation
Little A, Jones BC, DeBruine LM & Caldwell CA (2011) Social learning and human mate preferences: a potential mechanism for generating and maintaining between-population diversity in attraction. Philosophical Transactions B: Biological Sciences, 366 (1563), pp. 366-375. https://doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2010.0192

Abstract
Inspired by studies demonstrating mate-choice copying effects in non-human species, recent studies of attractiveness judgements suggest that social learning also influences human preferences. In the first part of our article, we review evidence for social learning effects on preferences in humans and other animals. In the second part, we present new empirical evidence that social learning not only influences the attractiveness of specific individuals, but can also generalize to judgements of previously unseen individuals possessing similar physical traits. The different conditions represent different populations and, once a preference arises in a population, social learning can lead to the spread of preferences within that population. In the final part of our article, we discuss the theoretical basis for, and possible impact of, biases in social learning whereby individuals may preferentially copy the choices of those with high status or better access to critical information about potential mates. Such biases could mean that the choices of a select few individuals carry the greatest weight, rapidly generating agreement in preferences within a population. Collectively, these issues suggest that social learning mechanisms encourage the spread of preferences for certain traits once they arise within a population and so may explain certain cross-cultural differences.

Keywords
social transmission; facial attractiveness; copy; learning; prestige bias; culture

Journal
Philosophical Transactions B: Biological Sciences: Volume 366, Issue 1563

StatusPublished
Author(s)Little, Anthony; Jones, Benedict C; DeBruine, Lisa M; Caldwell, Christine Anna
Publication date12/02/2011
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/17914
PublisherThe Royal Society
ISSN0962-8436
Scroll back to the top