Article

Effect of suppressing thoughts of desire to smoke on ratings of desire to smoke and tobacco withdrawal symptoms

Citation

Erskine JAK, Rawaf D, Grice S & Ussher M (2015) Effect of suppressing thoughts of desire to smoke on ratings of desire to smoke and tobacco withdrawal symptoms. SAGE Open, 5 (1). https://doi.org/10.1177/2158244015572488

Abstract
Studies indicate that while suppressing smoking thoughts increases subsequent smoking, it may have no impact on desire to smoke. However, previous research has examined suppression of general smoking thoughts rather than thoughts specifically related to desire to smoke. The present study investigated whether suppression of thoughts of desire to smoke results in subsequently elevated ratings of desire to smoke. An experimental study examined the effects of suppressing thoughts of desire to smoke, versus expressing thoughts of desire to smoke, versus a control group thinking about anything, on ratings of desire to smoke and tobacco withdrawal symptoms at four time points (before manipulations, just after manipulations, 5 min after, 10 min after). In addition, effects of suppressing thoughts of desire to smoke on subsequent reports of thoughts of desire to smoke were examined. Suppressing the thoughts of desire to smoke caused thought rebound (i.e., greater subsequent reports of thoughts of desire to smoke). However, compared with control groups, this suppression did not elevate subsequent ratings of desire to smoke. Suppressing the thoughts of desire to smoke does not elevate subsequent ratings of this desire. Increased cigarette consumption following suppression of smoking thoughts may be mediated by mechanisms other than increased desire to smoke.

Keywords
Smoking; tobacco; cravings; withdrawal; thought suppression;

Journal
SAGE Open: Volume 5, Issue 1

StatusPublished
Publication date31/03/2015
Publication date online28/02/2015
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/27030
PublisherSAGE
ISSN2158-2440