Article

Fear, family and the placing of emotion: Black women's responses to a breast cancer awareness intervention

Citation

Brown T, Dyck I, Greenhough B, Raven-Ellison M, Dembinsky M, Ornstein M & Duffy SW (2017) Fear, family and the placing of emotion: Black women's responses to a breast cancer awareness intervention. Social Science and Medicine, 195, pp. 90-96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.10.037

Abstract
This paper is based upon findings from the qualitative element of a mixed-methods study on the response of Black women aged 25–50 to a public health intervention related to breast cancer. The focus groups were conducted in the London Borough of Hackney, UK between 2013 and 2016, and were part of an evaluation of the effectiveness of a breast awareness DVD. While the content of the DVD was generally well-received by the participants, the focus group discussions revealed a complex and, at times, contradictory response to the women's construction as an ‘at risk’ community. As the paper highlights, for many of the women, breast cancer remains a disease of whiteness and the information provided in the DVD prompted a range of emotional responses; from anxiety and fear to a desire to become more knowledgeable and active in the promotion of self-care. As the paper argues, of particular importance to the women was the need to feel a much stronger emotional connection to the information presented in the DVD. The paper concludes by arguing that placing greater emphasis on feeling and emotion is an important dimension of future research in this area.

Keywords
Breast cancer; Breast awareness; DVD intervention; Emotion; Risk; Embodiment; Qualitative; UK

Journal
Social Science and Medicine: Volume 195

StatusPublished
Publication date31/12/2017
Publication date online03/11/2017
Date accepted by journal31/10/2017
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/27107
PublisherElsevier
ISSN0277-9536