Article

Cultural expectations of homeownership. Explaining changing legal definitions of flat 'ownership' within Britain

Citation

Robertson D (2006) Cultural expectations of homeownership. Explaining changing legal definitions of flat 'ownership' within Britain. Housing Studies, 21 (1), pp. 35-52. https://doi.org/10.1080/02673030500391080

Abstract
Following the break-up of privately rented flats in both England and Wales, and Scotland, two distinct property 'ownership' systems emerged. Each sought to provide individual 'ownership' of the flat and collective management of the block in which the flat was contained. Leasehold 'ownership' effectively retained the previous landlord tenant relationship because of a peculiarity in English law that only allows 'positive covenants' - such as maintenance obligations, to be enforced on the first purchaser of a flat, not subsequent purchasers. Although in Scotland outright individual ownership of a flat was legally possible, the management arrangements covering the common parts of the building have not proved satisfactory. Neither legal arrangement put in place an 'ownership' or 'governance' regime which matched popular cultural expectations of what individual home ownership should constitute. The scale of and scope of property law reform over the last 30 years illustrates how these popular cultural expectations have demanded due recognition within the British property system.

Keywords
Multi-owned property; flats; home-ownership; property law; Home ownership Great Britain; Real property Valuation Great Britain; Housing Great Britain

Journal
Housing Studies: Volume 21, Issue 1

StatusPublished
Publication date31/01/2006
Publication date online22/01/2007
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/1375
PublisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)
ISSN0267-3037