Article

Service learning in Britain between the Wars: university students and unemployed camps

Details

Citation

Field J (2012) Service learning in Britain between the Wars: university students and unemployed camps. History of Education, 41 (2), pp. 195-212. https://doi.org/10.1080/0046760X.2011.582047

Abstract
This article considers the role of university staff and students in organising camps for the unemployed in interwar Britain. These ventures can be understood as showing similarities with nineteenth century social service initiatives like the settlements, and also with contemporary developments in service learning. From the organisers' perspective, they were intended to bridge class divisions, create community and develop new styles of leadership. While these were achieved to some degree, the camp experience also had unintended consequences, in developing new social awareness and sometimes political commitment among middle class youth.

Keywords
Work camps; Service learning; Higher education; Citizenship; Volunteering; Work camps Great Britain; Student service Great Britain; Unemployment Great Britain History 20th century

Journal
History of Education: Volume 41, Issue 2

StatusPublished
Publication date31/12/2012
Date accepted by journal14/04/2011
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/3340
PublisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)
ISSN0046-760X

People (1)

People

Professor John Field

Professor John Field

Emeritus Professor, Education