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Book Chapter

Constitutional Change without Bullets: Parties, Pressure Groups, Elections and Devolution in Scotland

Citation
Lynch P (2009) Constitutional Change without Bullets: Parties, Pressure Groups, Elections and Devolution in Scotland. In: Perales Cristina (ed.). Media and Nationalism: The Basque, the Catalan, the Northern Ireland and the Scottish Cases, Vic, Spain: University of Vic/ Eumografic, pp. 79-95.

Abstract
Scottish nationalism has been characterized by non-violent political activism since the 1920s. Such activism has included pressure group lobbying, electoral campaigning, mass petitions, constitutional conventions and demonstrations. Much of the activity has focused on parties and elections. The nature of the media in Scotland has facilitated the growth of nationalism and debates about political autonomy by providing a communicative space to discuss such issues. The combined effects of this has been to place the issue of Scottish autonomy firmly onto the political agendas of political parties and governments, leading to a range of government commissions, legislation and institutional measures to deal with the issue in the context of the UK state. Moreover, such debates continued after the creation of autonomous institutions in 1999, sparked by the SNP victory at the 2007 election.

Keywords
Nationalism; Devolution; political parties; Scotland; Political parties Scotland; Nationalism Scotland; Decentralization in government Scotland

StatusPublished
Author(s)Lynch, Peter
Publication date01/06/2009
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/2629
PublisherUniversity of Vic/ Eumografic
Publisher URLhttps://www.libreriaproteo.com/…TTISH-CASES.html
Place of publicationVic, Spain
ISBN978-84-936186-4-3
LanguageEnglish
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