Article

Prediction of cognitive dysfunction after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using serum neuron-specific enolase and protein S-100

Details

Citation

Grubb NR, Simpson C, Sherwood RA, Abraha HD, Cobbe SM, O'Carroll R, Deary I & Fox KAA (2007) Prediction of cognitive dysfunction after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest using serum neuron-specific enolase and protein S-100. Heart, 93 (10), pp. 1268-1273. https://doi.org/10.1136/hrt.2006.091314

Abstract
Background: More than 50% of patients initially resuscitated from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest die in hospital. Objective: To investigate the prognostic value of serum protein S-100 and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) concentrations for predicting (a) memory impairment at discharge; (b) in-hospital death, after resuscitation from out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Methods: In a prospective study of 143 consecutive survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, serum samples were obtained within 12, 24-48 and 72-96 hours after the event. S-100 and NSE concentrations were measured. Pre-discharge cognitive assessment of patients (n = 49) was obtained by the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test (RBMT). The relationship between biochemical brain marker concentrations and RBMT scores, and between marker concentrations and the risk of in-hospital death was examined. Results: A moderate negative relationship was found between S-100 concentration and memory test score, at all time points. The relationship between NSE and memory test scores was weaker. An S-100 concentration greater than 0.29 ?g/l at time B predicted moderate to severe memory impairment with absolute specificity (42.8% sensitivity). S-100 remained an independent predictor of memory function after adjustment for clinical variables and cardiac arrest timing indices. NSE and S-100 concentrations were greater in patients who died than in those who survived, at all time points. Both NSE and S-100 remained predictors of in-hospital death after adjustment for clinical variables and cardiac arrest timing indices. The threshold concentrations yielding 100% specificity for in-hospital death were S-100: 1.20 ?g/l (sensitivity 44.8%); NSE 71.0 ?g/l (sensitivity 14.0%). Conclusions: Estimation of serum S-100 concentration after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest can be used to identify patients at risk of significant cognitive impairment at discharge. Serum S-100 and NSE concentrations measured 24-48 hours after cardiac arrest provide useful additional information.

Keywords
Adjustment; Assessment; at risk; Brain; cardiac arrest; Death; discharge; DYSFUNCTION; Estimation; EVENT; function; IMPAIRMENT; Information; INVESTIGATE; memories; Memory; method; methods; objective; patient; Patients; Prediction; predictors; Prospective Studies; PROTEIN; relationship; risk; SAMPLE; SAMPLES; SERUM; time; VALUE; WHO

Journal
Heart: Volume 93, Issue 10

StatusPublished
Publication date31/10/2007
Publication date online13/05/2007
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/9214
PublisherBMJ Publishing Group/British Cardiovascular Society
ISSN1355-6037

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People

Professor Ronan O'Carroll
Professor Ronan O'Carroll

Professor, Psychology

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