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Article

Social interaction with non-averse group-mates modifies a learned food aversion in single- and mixed-species groups of Tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis and S-labiatus)

Citation
Prescott MJ, Buchanan-Smith HM & Smith AC (2005) Social interaction with non-averse group-mates modifies a learned food aversion in single- and mixed-species groups of Tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis and S-labiatus). American Journal of Primatology, 65 (4), pp. 313-326. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajp.20118

Abstract
For social species, being a member of a cohesive group and performing activities as a coordinated unit appear to provide a mechanism for the efficient transmission of information about food. Social learning about food palatability was investigated in two captive primates, Saguinus fuscicollis and S. labiatus, which form stable and cohesive mixed-species groups in the wild. We explored whether an induced food aversion toward a preferred food is modified during and after social interaction with nonaverse conspecifics or congeners. Sets of intra- and interspecific pairs were presented with two foods, one of which was considered distasteful by one of the pairs (the other was palatable), and their behavior was compared pre-interaction, during interaction, and post-interaction. For the aversely-conditioned individuals of both species, the change in social context corresponded to a change in their preference for the food that they considered unpalatable, regardless of whether they had interacted with a conspecific or congeneric pair, and the change in food preference was maintained post-interaction. In a control condition, in which averse individuals did not have the opportunity to interact with non-averse animals, S. fuscicollis sampled the preferred food, but not as quickly as when given the opportunity to interact. We conclude that the social learning demonstrated here may allow individual tamarins to track environmental change, such as fruit ripening, more efficiently than asocial learning alone, because social learners can more quickly and safely focus on appropriate behavior by sharing up-to-date foraging information. Furthermore, since the behavior of congeners, as well as conspecifics, acts to influence food choice in a more adaptive direction, social learning about food palatability may be an advantage of mixed-species group formation to tamarins of both species.

Keywords
social learning; food aversion; tamarins; Saguinus fuscicollis; Saguinus labiatus; mixed-species groups

Journal
American Journal of Primatology: Volume 65, Issue 4

StatusPublished
Author(s)Prescott, Mark J; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M; Smith, Andrew C
Publication date30/04/2005
Publication date online15/04/2005
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/7549
PublisherWiley
ISSN0275-2565
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