Article

Fatty acid compositions of 10 freshwater invertebrates which are natural food organisms of Atlantic salmon parr (Salmo salar): A comparison with commercial diets

Citation

Bell JG, Ghioni C & Sargent JR (1994) Fatty acid compositions of 10 freshwater invertebrates which are natural food organisms of Atlantic salmon parr (Salmo salar): A comparison with commercial diets. Aquaculture, 128 (3-4), pp. 301-313. https://doi.org/10.1016/0044-8486%2894%2990319-0

Abstract
Ten species of freshwater invertebrates that are natural food organisms available to Atlantic salmon parr were collected and their lipid composition determined: stonefly nymphs (Plecoptera), beetle larvae (Coleoptera), Chironomidae (Diptera), water boatmen (Corixidae and Notonecta; Heteroptera), mayfly nymphs (Ecdyonurus venosus, Caenis, Ephemerella; Ephemeroptera), gammerids (crustaceans), Oligochaeta (anelids). Neutral lipids represented 40-70% and polar lipids 26-55% of total lipids. Triacylglycerol was always more than 35% of total lipids. Phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) were the major components of phospholipids. Monoenoic fatty acids and polyunsaturated acids (PUFA) were the most abundant fatty acids in total lipids. Saturated fatty acids comprised only 20-30% of the total fatty acids. PUFAs were principally present as the n-3 series, especially 18:3n-3 and 20:5n-3, 22:6n-3 was present only in small amounts. Fatty acids of the n-6 series were mostly represented by 18:2n-6 and 20:4n-6. The invertebrate organisms analysed contained higher levels of 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, 20:4n-6 and 20:5n-3 but considerably less 22:6n-3 than commercial diets used in smolt production. These results suggest that a dietary fatty acid composition more closely resembling the freshwater invertebrates might be beneficial for growth, development and the prevention of pathologies in salmon parr.

Keywords
Fats and fatty compounds; Invertebrates — as fish food; Salmo salar; Parr-smolt transformation

Journal
Aquaculture: Volume 128, Issue 3-4

StatusPublished
Publication date31/12/1994
PublisherElsevier
ISSN0044-8486