Skip header navigation

University of Stirling

×

Article

Communal larval rearing of European lobster (Homarus gammarus): Family identification by microsatellite DNA profiling and offspring fitness comparisons

Citation
Jorstad KE, Prodohl PA, Kristiansen TS, Hughes M, Farestveit E, Taggart J, Agnalt A & Ferguson A (2005) Communal larval rearing of European lobster (Homarus gammarus): Family identification by microsatellite DNA profiling and offspring fitness comparisons. Aquaculture, 247 (1-4), pp. 275-285. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2005.02.025

Abstract
Stock enhancement experiments of European lobster (Homarus gammarus) have been carried out around the Kvitsøy Islands in south-western Norway since 1990. In addition to releases of coded wire tagged lobster juveniles (cultured) and subsequent monitoring of commercial fishery, a lobster hatchery was established in 1997. Several experiments were made on the communal-rearing approach where the performance of mixed larval groups (families) was evaluated under identical conditions. Berried females of wild and cultured origin and their respective fertilised eggs were screened by using microsatellite DNA profiling involving a multiplex set of six lobster specific primers, thereby allowing determination of both parental genotypes. Each female were kept separately during hatching, and the offspring were later mixed and raised in a communal rearing system. The early-larval survival was estimated at stage IV (bottom stage), and the survivors were identified to family and group by microsatellite profiling. Five different communal experiments were conducted, representing offspring from 65 berried females. Of the surviving larvae, 6.3% could not be assigned to family due to degraded DNA and no PCR amplification. Significant differences in early survival between offspring of wild and cultured origin were found in the experiments. No differences between the groups were found in stage IV larval size. Based on the pooled data on survival (as a measure of early larvae fitness) offspring of cultured females displayed a relative fitness of 60% in comparison to offspring from wild females. Large variation in survival was also observed among families within the "wild" and "cultured" groups, suggesting a genetic component for these traits and a potential for selective breeding.

Keywords
European lobster; Homarus gammarus; microsatellite DNA profiling; communal rearing; offspring survival; stock enhancement

Journal
Aquaculture: Volume 247, Issue 1-4

StatusPublished
Author(s)Jorstad, Knut E; Prodohl, Paulo A; Kristiansen, Tore S; Hughes, Maria; Farestveit, Eva; Taggart, John; Agnalt, Anne-Lisbeth; Ferguson, Andrew
Publication date30/06/2005
PublisherElsevier
ISSN0044-8486
Scroll back to the top