Article

A pilot study to explore whether airborne endotoxins play a role in the association between environmental tobacco smoke and non-respiratory, smoking-related diseases

Citation

Pell J, Tavernier G & Haw S (2011) A pilot study to explore whether airborne endotoxins play a role in the association between environmental tobacco smoke and non-respiratory, smoking-related diseases. International Journal of Epidemiology, 40 (4), pp. 1128-1129. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyq236

Abstract
First paragraph: Lipopolysaccharides (endotoxins produced by Gramnegative bacteria) are present on the surface of cigarettes and have been implicated in a number of diseases. Active smoking predisposes to periodontal disease which, in turn, facilitates gastrointestinal absorption of endotoxins. Serum endotoxin concentrations are higher among active smokers and are associated with risk of cardiovascular disease. In addition to being present on the surface of cigarettes, endotoxins are present in both mainstream and sidestream cigarette smoke. Inhaled airborne endotoxins have been implicated in the pathogenesis of respiratory disease. In a guinea pig model, endotoxins have been shown to penetrate the lung barrier and be detectable in the blood. Similarly, non-smokers with occupational exposure to organic dust containing high levels of endotoxin have been shown to have increased plasma concentrations of lipopolysaccharide. However, no previous study has examined whether exposure to environmental tobacco smoke is associated with increased serum endotoxin concentrations.

Notes
Output Type: Letter

Journal
International Journal of Epidemiology: Volume 40, Issue 4

StatusPublished
Publication date31/08/2011
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/16653
PublisherOxford University Press
ISSN0300-5771

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