Article

Changes in exposure of adult non-smokers to secondhand smoke after implementation of smoke-free legislation in Scotland: national cross sectional survey

Citation

Haw S & Gruer L (2007) Changes in exposure of adult non-smokers to secondhand smoke after implementation of smoke-free legislation in Scotland: national cross sectional survey. BMJ, 335 (7619), pp. 549-552. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.39315.670208.47

Abstract
OBJECTIVE To measure change in adult non-smokers' exposure to secondhand smoke in public and private places after smoke-free legislation was implemented in Scotland. DESIGN Repeat cross sectional survey. SETTING Scotland. PARTICIPANTS Scottish adults, aged 18 to 74 years, recruited and interviewed in their homes. INTERVENTION Comprehensive smoke-free legislation that prohibits smoking in virtually all enclosed public places and workplaces, including bars, restaurants, and cafes. OUTCOME MEASURES Salivary cotinine, self reported exposure to smoke in public and private places, and self reported smoking restriction in homes and in cars. RESULTS Overall, geometric mean cotinine concentrations in adult non-smokers fell by 39% (95% confidence interval 29% to 47%), from 0.43 ng/ml at baseline to 0.26 ng/ml after legislation (P<0.001). In non-smokers from non-smoking households, geometric mean cotinine concentrations fell by 49% (40% to 56%), from 0.35 ng/ml to 0.18 ng/ml (P<0.001). The 16% fall in cotinine concentrations in non-smokers from smoking households was not statistically significant. Reduction in exposure to secondhand smoke was associated with a reduction after legislation in reported exposure to secondhand smoke in public places (pubs, other workplaces, and public transport) but not in homes and cars. We found no evidence of displacement of smoking from public places into the home. CONCLUSIONS Implementation of Scotland's smoke-free legislation has been accompanied within one year by a large reduction in exposure to secondhand smoke, which has been greatest in non-smokers living in non-smoking households. Non-smokers living in smoking households continue to have high levels of exposure to secondhand smoke.

Journal
BMJ: Volume 335, Issue 7619

StatusPublished
Publication date30/09/2007
Date accepted by journal15/07/2007
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/16651
PublisherBMJ Publishing
ISSN0959-8138

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