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Article

Epidemiology of a Daphnia-Multiparasite System and Its Implications for the Red Queen

Citation
Auld S, Hall SR & Duffy MA (2012) Epidemiology of a Daphnia-Multiparasite System and Its Implications for the Red Queen. PLoS ONE, 7 (6), Art. No.: e0039561. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0039564

Abstract
The Red Queen hypothesis can explain the maintenance of host and parasite diversity. However, the Red Queen requires genetic specificity for infection risk (i.e., that infection depends on the exact combination of host and parasite genotypes) and strongly virulent effects of infection on host fitness. A European crustacean (Daphnia magna) - bacterium (Pasteuria ramosa) system typifies such specificity and high virulence. We studied the North American host Daphnia dentifera and its natural parasite Pasteuria ramosa, and also found strong genetic specificity for infection success and high virulence. These results suggest that Pasteuria could promote Red Queen dynamics with D. dentifera populations as well. However, the Red Queen might be undermined in this system by selection from a more common yeast parasite (Metschnikowia bicuspidata). Resistance to the yeast did not correlate with resistance to Pasteuria among host genotypes, suggesting that selection by Metschnikowia should proceed relatively independently of selection by Pasteuria.

Journal
PLoS ONE: Volume 7, Issue 6

StatusPublished
Author(s)Auld, Stuart; Hall, Spencer R; Duffy, Meghan A
Publication date25/06/2012
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/19864
PublisherPublic Library of Science
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