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Article

Relation of genetic phylogeny and geographical distance of tick-borne encephalitis virus in central Europe

Citation
Weidmann M, Ruzek D, Krivanec K, Zoller G, Essbauer S, Pfeffer M, Zanotto PMDA, Hufert FT & Dobler G (2011) Relation of genetic phylogeny and geographical distance of tick-borne encephalitis virus in central Europe. Journal of General Virology, 92 (8), pp. 1906-1916. https://doi.org/10.1099/vir.0.032417-0

Abstract
Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is the most important arboviral agent causing disease of the central nervous system in central Europe. In this study, 61 TBEV E gene sequences derived from 48 isolates from the Czech Republic, and four isolates and nine TBEV strains detected in ticks from Germany, covering more than half a century from 1954 to 2009, were sequenced and subjected to phylogenetic and Bayesian phylodynamic analysis to determine the phylogeography of TBEV in central Europe. The general Eurasian continental east-to-west pattern of the spread of TBEV was confirmed at the regional level but is interlaced with spreading that arises because of local geography and anthropogenic influence. This spread is reflected by the disease pattern in the Czech Republic that has been observed since 1991. The overall evolutionary rate was estimated to be approximately 8×10-4 substitutions per nucleotide per year. The analysis of the TBEV E genes of 11 strains isolated at one natural focus in Žďár Kaplice proved for the first time that TBEV is indeed subject to local evolution.

Journal
Journal of General Virology: Volume 92, Issue 8

StatusPublished
Author(s)Weidmann, Manfred; Ruzek, Daniel; Krivanec, Karel; Zoller, Gudrun; Essbauer, Sandra; Pfeffer, Martin; Zanotto, Paolo M D A; Hufert, Frank T; Dobler, Gerhard
Publication date31/08/2011
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/18303
PublisherSociety for General Microbiology
ISSN0022-1317
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