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Article

Young Gide Reading Flaubert: Les Cahiers d’André Walter and the Galloping Sphinx

Citation
Hartford J (2011) Young Gide Reading Flaubert: Les Cahiers d’André Walter and the Galloping Sphinx. Dix-Neuf - Journal of the Society of Dix-Neuviemist, 15 (1), pp. 147-153. https://doi.org/10.1179/147873111X12973011702680

Abstract
This essay examines a figure from Flaubert's Tentation de saint Antoine, the galloping sphinx, as it is quoted by André Gide in his first novel, Les Cahiers d'André Walter (1891). It argues that Gide recognized how Flaubert used this figure as a locus for his anxieties, and that Gide imitated its placement within a mise en abyme, appropriating the symbol for his own dynamic purposes. To unpack this multifaceted borrowing, the essay first explores the range of Flaubertian sources for Gide's quotation, to analyse it as a treatment of hybrid biographical context, which both authors conceal to some degree. The essay then considers Gide's literary aspirations, which contributed to a partial identification with, and hostility to, Flaubert on the part of the younger author, as well as the musical aspects of Gide's technique. It concludes by proposing the jackal as Gide's symbolic other for his own ambitious mises en abyme.

Keywords
LA TENTATION DE SAINT ANTOINE; SPHINX; MISE EN ABYME; POETICS; RECEPTION; SYMBOLISM; BORROWING; ANXIETY; ANTITHESIS; TRANSFERENCE; JACKAL

Journal
Dix-Neuf - Journal of the Society of Dix-Neuviemist: Volume 15, Issue 1

StatusPublished
Author(s)Hartford, Jason
Publication date30/04/2011
PublisherManey Publishing
eISSN1478-7318
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