Article

Research into information and communications technology in education: disciplined inquiries for telling stories better

Details

Citation

Gardner J & Galanouli D (2004) Research into information and communications technology in education: disciplined inquiries for telling stories better. Technology, Pedagogy and Education, 13 (2), pp. 147-161. https://doi.org/10.1080/14759390400200177

Abstract
This article considers whether there are underlying problems in research into information and communications technology (ICT) and reflects specifically on the call for researchers to use quantitative methods more in their work. Reasons for potential weaknesses in educational and, more specifically, ICT research are discussed and the ‘quantitative deficit' is considered in the light of such key issues as ‘fitness for purpose'. ICT research needs somehow to create a measure of freedom from the pressure to examine immediate-term issues relating to ICT policy and practice. More time and appropriate research activities need to be found if we are to lay better foundations for theory building from a more cumulative and coherent research base. The authors contend that the debate about whether to use quantitative or qualitative methods is barren, and that the fit-for-purpose principle should be the central issue in methodological design. The article concludes by calling for all ICT research to reflect the principles of disciplined inquiry: ensuring that we tell our research stories better, by making our evidence explicit and the basis of our arguments open to full scrutiny.

Journal
Technology, Pedagogy and Education: Volume 13, Issue 2

StatusPublished
Publication date31/12/2004
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/19521
PublisherTaylor and Francis
ISSN1475-939X

People (1)

People

Professor John Gardner
Professor John Gardner

Professor, Education