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Article

Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers in the South Asian rainforest: geoarchaeology of inhabited rockshelters in south-western Sri Lanka

Citation
Kourampas N, Simpson I, Perera HN & Deraniyagala SU (2008) Late Pleistocene hunter-gatherers in the South Asian rainforest: geoarchaeology of inhabited rockshelters in south-western Sri Lanka. Antiquity, 82 (316). http://antiquity.ac.uk/projgall/kourampas/index.html

Abstract
First paragraph: Sri Lanka's rainforests and grasslands, fashioned by the interaction of mountainous relief and Late Quaternary fluctuations of the Asian Monsoon, were inhabited by anatomically modern hunter-gatherers as early as at least c. 40 000 BP (Perera, in press). Rockshelters in the south-western, humid-tropical part of the island (Figure 1) have yielded some of the earliest manifestations of 'behavioural modernity' in South Asia, including geometric microliths, articles of personal ornamentation (Figure 2), evidence for long networks of exchange, differentiated use of space, burial and widespread use of ochre (Deraniyagala 1992; Wijeyapala 1997; James 2007; Perera, in press). This archaeological record, together with Sri Lanka's location halfway on the inferred route of anatomically modern human dispersal to Australasia (Figure 1a), locate the island's prehistory at the centre of current debates on late Pleistocene human evolution, ecology, dispersal and cultural change.

Journal
Antiquity: Volume 82, Issue 316

StatusPublished
Author(s)Kourampas, Nikos; Simpson, Ian; Perera, H Nimal; Deraniyagala, Siran U
Publication date31/12/2008
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/19834
PublisherDurham University
Publisher URLhttp://antiquity.ac.uk/projgall/kourampas/index.html
ISSN0003-598X
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