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Book Chapter

Leisure, Symbolism and War: Hermitage Castle, Liddesdale and the Anglo-Scottish Border

Citation
Oram R (2014) Leisure, Symbolism and War: Hermitage Castle, Liddesdale and the Anglo-Scottish Border. In: Ettel P, Flambard HA & O'Conor K (eds.) Château et frontière. Actes du colloque international d'Aabenraa (Danemark, 24-31 août 2012). Château Gaillard. Etudes de castellologie médiévale, 26. Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols, pp. 325-332. http://www.brepols.net/Pages/ShowProduct.aspx?prod_id=IS-9782841335022-1

Abstract
Originating as a 13th-century hunting-lodge in the lordship of Liddesdale, as Anglo-Scottish warfare turned the area into a contested border zone, Hermitage replaced the old caput at Liddel. The Earls of Douglas developed Hermitage into a symbolic projection of their power and status that contained spacious accommodation and a ceremonial forum in which to exercise lordly authority, gave security for their household and the defence of the region, and a base for the economic management of Liddesdale. Originally a bold statement of Douglas power, warfare, depopulation and climate change converted it from the centrepiece of a prosperous estate into a garrisoned frontier-post of declining significance. When Scotland and England were united in 1603, Hermitage was abandoned.

StatusPublished
Author(s)Oram, Richard
Title of seriesChâteau Gaillard. Etudes de castellologie médiévale
Number in series26
Publication date31/12/2014
PublisherBrepols
Publisher URLhttp://www.brepols.net/…-9782841335022-1
Place of publicationTurnhout, Belgium
ISSN of series0577-5752
ISBN978-2-84133-502-2
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