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Article

Walk@Work: An automated intervention to increase walking in university employees not achieving 10,000 daily steps

Citation
Gilson ND, Faulkner G, Murphy MH, Meyer MRU, Washington T, Ryde G, Arbour-Nicitopoulos KP & Dillon KA (2013) Walk@Work: An automated intervention to increase walking in university employees not achieving 10,000 daily steps. Preventive Medicine, 56 (5), pp. 283-287. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.01.022

Abstract
OBJECTIVE This study assessed the workday step counts of lower active (<10,000 daily steps) university employees using an automated, web-based walking intervention (Walk@Work). METHODS Academic and administrative staff (n=390; 45.6±10.8years; BMI 27.2±5.5kg/m(2); 290 women) at five campuses (Australia [x2], Canada, Northern Ireland and the United States), were given a pedometer, access to the website program (2010-11) and tasked with increasing workday walking by 1000 daily steps above baseline, every two weeks, over a six week period. Step count changes at four weeks post intervention were evaluated relative to campus and baseline walking. RESULTS Across the sample, step counts significantly increased from baseline to post-intervention (1477 daily steps; p=0.001). Variations in increases were evident between campuses (largest difference of 870 daily steps; p=0.04) and for baseline activity status. Those least active at baseline (<5000 daily steps; n=125) increased step counts the most (1837 daily steps; p=0.001), whereas those most active (7500-9999 daily steps; n=79) increased the least (929 daily steps; p=0.001). CONCLUSIONS Walk@Work increased workday walking by 25% in this sample overall. Increases occurred through an automated program, at campuses in different countries, and were most evident for those most in need of intervention.

Keywords
Walking; Employees; Intervention

Journal
Preventive Medicine: Volume 56, Issue 5

StatusPublished
Author(s)Gilson, Nicholas D; Faulkner, Guy; Murphy, Marie H; Meyer, M Renee Umstattd; Washington, Tracy; Ryde, Gemma; Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Kelly P; Dillon, Kimber A
Publication date31/05/2013
Publication date online13/02/2013
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/20632
PublisherElsevier
ISSN0091-7435
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