Article

The stroke ‘Act FAST’ campaign: Remembered but not understood?

Citation

Dombrowski SU, White M, Mackintosh JE, Gellert P, Araujo-Soares V, Thomson RG, Rodgers H, Ford GA & Sniehotta FF (2015) The stroke ‘Act FAST’ campaign: Remembered but not understood?. International Journal of Stroke, 10 (3), pp. 324-330. https://doi.org/10.1111/ijs.12353

Abstract
Background: The stroke awareness raising campaign ‘Act FAST' (Face, Arms, Speech: Time to call Emergency Medical Services) has been rolled out in multiple waves in England, but impact on stroke recognition and response remains unclear. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to test whether providing knowledge of the FAST acronym through a standard Act FAST campaign leaflet increases accurate recognition and response in stroke-based scenario measures. Methods: This is a population-based, cross-sectional survey of adults in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, sampled using the electoral register, with individuals randomized to receive a questionnaire and Act FAST leaflet (n = 2500) or a questionnaire only (n = 2500) in 2012. Campaign message retention, stroke recognition, and response measured through 16 scenario-based vignettes were assessed. Data were analyzed in 2013. Results: Questionnaire return rate was 32·3% (n = 1615). No differences were found between the leaflet and no-leaflet groups in return rate or demographics. Participants who received a leaflet showed better campaign recall (75·7% vs. 68·2%, P = 0·003) and recalled more FAST mnemonic elements (66·1% vs. 45·3% elements named correctly, P < 0·001). However, there were no between-group differences for stroke recognition and response to stroke-based scenarios (P > 0·05). Conclusions: Despite greater levels of recall of specific ‘Act FAST' elements among those receiving the Act FAST leaflet, there was no impact on stroke recognition and response measures.

Keywords
acute stroke therapy; epidemiology; intervention; prevention; stroke; thrombolysis

Journal
International Journal of Stroke: Volume 10, Issue 3

StatusPublished
Publication date30/04/2015
Publication date online31/08/2014
Date accepted by journal12/06/2014
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/22164
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
ISSN1747-4930