Lecture

Sequential treatment of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with SLICE® (emamectin benzoate) and hydrogen peroxide for the control of salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis)

Citation

Morris D, Gould C, Roy W, Bassett DI & Cockerill D (2014) Sequential treatment of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) with SLICE® (emamectin benzoate) and hydrogen peroxide for the control of salmon lice (Lepeophtheirus salmonis) (Presentation) 10th International Sea Lice Conference, Portland, ME, USA, 31.08.2014-05.09.2014. http://sealice2014.businesscatalyst.com/assets/abstract-book-v6.2-final2.pdf

Abstract
SLICE® (emamectin benzoate) is a medicated feed premix indicated for the treatment and prevention of sea lice infestations in salmon. When fed at the standard dose rate of 50µg emamectin benzoate (EB)/kg body weight/day for 7 consecutive days, SLICE kills all parasitic stages of sea lice. Since its’ introduction over a decade ago, SLICE has established a proven record of reliable field performance and thus become the leading product for sea lice control. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), registered as Interox™ Paramove 50™ (Solvay Chemical International S.A.), is licensed for the bath treatment of salmon suffering from infestation with motile (pre-adult to adult) sea lice. Hydrogen peroxide has been used widely as part of sea lice prevention programs. Following integrated pest management guidelines, the industry has been looking at ways to improve sea lice control utilizing the range of available registered products. The sequential use of SLICE and hydrogen peroxide has been employed to improve sea lice control, particularly in areas where sea lice populations are showing reduced sensitivity to one or more of the registered sea lice treatments. To further evaluate the use of this sequential treatment approach, a laboratory study was conducted using an EB-resistant strain of sea lice. This demonstrated that the sequential use of SLICE followed by hydrogen peroxide at either 7 days or 12 days post-SLICE results in good clearance and subsequently reduced settlement of EBresistant strains of sea lice for at least 39 days after the end of the SLICE treatment.

StatusUnpublished
Publication date31/08/2014
Related URLshttp://sealice2014.businesscatalyst.com/…-v6.2-final2.pdf
Publisher URLhttp://sealice2014.businesscatalyst.com/…-v6.2-final2.pdf
Conference10th International Sea Lice Conference
Conference locationPortland, ME, USA
Dates