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Article

Thomas Gray and the Goths: Philology, Poetry, and the Uses of the Norse Past in Eighteenth-Century England

Citation
Williams KJ (2014) Thomas Gray and the Goths: Philology, Poetry, and the Uses of the Norse Past in Eighteenth-Century England, Review of English Studies, 65 (271), pp. 694-710.

Abstract
In 1761 Thomas Gray composed two loose translations of Old Norse poems: The Fatal Sisters and The Descent of Odin. This article reconstructs Gray’s complex engagement with the world of seventeenth-century Scandinavian scholarship: recovering the texts he used, the ideologies contained within them, and the ways in which he naturalized those ideologies into his own vision of the history of English literature. Gray became aware of Old Norse poetry in the course of composing a never-completed history of English poetry in the 1750s, but this article argues that it was not until the publication of James Macpherson’s Fragments of Ancient Poetry (1760) that Gray became inspired to engage poetically with the Scandinavian past. Imitating Macpherson, he created his own ‘translations’ of what he understood to be the British literary heritage and, in doing so, composed a vivid and surprising variation on the grand myths of early modern Scandinavian nationalism.

Journal
Review of English Studies: Volume 65, Issue 271

StatusPublished
Author(s)Williams, Kelsey Jackson
Publication date01/09/2014
Publication date online28/03/2014
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/24289
PublisherUniversity of Oxford Press
ISSN0034-6551
LanguageEnglish
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