Skip header navigation

University of Stirling

×

Article

Response of Copepods to Elevated pCO2 and Environmental Copper as Co-Stressors - A Multigenerational Study

Citation
Fitzer S, Caldwell GS, Clare AS, Upstill-Goddard RC & Bentley MG (2013) Response of Copepods to Elevated pCO2 and Environmental Copper as Co-Stressors - A Multigenerational Study. PLoS ONE, 8 (8), Art. No.: e71257. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0071257

Abstract
We examined the impacts of ocean acidification and copper as co-stressors on the reproduction and population level responses of the benthic copepod Tisbe battagliai across two generations. Naupliar production, growth, and cuticle elemental composition were determined for four pH values: 8.06 (control); 7.95; 7.82; 7.67, with copper addition to concentrations equivalent to those in benthic pore waters. An additive synergistic effect was observed; the decline in naupliar production was greater with added copper at decreasing pH than for decreasing pH alone. Naupliar production modelled for the two generations revealed a negative synergistic impact between ocean acidification and environmentally relevant copper concentrations. Conversely, copper addition enhanced copepod growth, with larger copepods produced at each pH compared to the impact of pH alone. Copepod digests revealed significantly reduced cuticle concentrations of sulphur, phosphorus and calcium under decreasing pH; further, copper uptake increased to toxic levels that lead to reduced naupliar production. These data suggest that ocean acidification will enhance copper bioavailability, resulting in larger, but less fecund individuals that may have an overall detrimental outcome for copepod populations. © 2013 Fitzer et al.

Journal
PLoS ONE: Volume 8, Issue 8

StatusPublished
Author(s)Fitzer, Susan; Caldwell, Gary S; Clare, Anthony S; Upstill-Goddard, Robert C; Bentley, Matthew G
Publication date07/08/2013
Publication date online07/08/2013
Date accepted by journal27/06/2013
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/26499
PublisherPublic Library of Science
Scroll back to the top