Skip header navigation

University of Stirling

×

Book Chapter

Race and the Legacy of the First World War in French Anti-Colonial Politics of the 1920s

Citation
Murphy D (2017) Race and the Legacy of the First World War in French Anti-Colonial Politics of the 1920s. In: Ewence H & Grady T (eds.) Minorities and the First World War: from war to peace. London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 201-225. https://doi.org/10.1057/978-1-137-53975-5_8

Abstract
There has been relatively little historical research on the small number of African veterans who stayed on in France after the First World War and became militants in the radical anti-colonial movements created in the 1920s. From his entry onto the political stage in late 1924 until his early death three years later, the most celebrated and feared of these anti-colonial militants was Lamine Senghor, a decorated war veteran from Senegal. This chapter will chart Senghor’s brief career as an activist, focusing primarily on the ways in which he projected his identity as a veteran in his speeches and writings, as well as exploring, more generally, how France’s “blood debt” to its colonial subjects became a key theme of anti-colonial discourse in the interwar period.

Keywords
first world war; tirailleurs sénégalais; anti-colonialism;

StatusPublished
Author(s)Murphy, David
Publication date31/12/2017
Publication date online31/07/2017
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/26790
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Place of publicationLondon
ISBN9781137539748
eISBN9781137539755
Scroll back to the top