Article

Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of text messages with or without endowment incentives for weight management in men with obesity (Game of Stones): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

Details

Citation

Macaulay L, O’Dolan C, Avenell A, Carroll P, Cotton S, Dombrowski S, Elders A, Goulao B, Gray C, Harris FM, Hunt K, Kee F, Torrens C, van der Pol M & Hoddinott P (2022) Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of text messages with or without endowment incentives for weight management in men with obesity (Game of Stones): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials, 23 (1), Art. No.: 582. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-022-06504-5

Abstract
Background Obesity increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, mobility problems and some cancers, and its prevalence is rising. Men engage less than women in existing weight loss interventions. Game of Stones builds on a successful feasibility study and aims to find out if automated text messages with or without endowment incentives are effective and cost-effective for weight loss at 12 months compared to a waiting list comparator arm in men with obesity. Methods A 3-arm, parallel group, assessor-blind superiority randomised controlled trial with process evaluation will recruit 585 adult men with body mass index of 30 kg/m2 or more living in and around three UK centres (Belfast, Bristol, Glasgow), purposively targeting disadvantaged areas. Intervention groups: (i) automated, theory-informed text messages daily for 12 months plus endowment incentives linked to verified weight loss targets at 3, 6 and 12 months; (ii) the same text messages and weight loss assessment protocol; (iii) comparator group: 12 month waiting list, then text messages for 3 months. The primary outcome is percentage weight change at 12 months from baseline. Secondary outcomes at 12 months are as follows: quality of life, wellbeing, mental health, weight stigma, behaviours, satisfaction and confidence. Follow-up includes weight at 24 months. A health economic evaluation will measure cost-effectiveness over the trial and over modelled lifetime: including health service resource-use and quality-adjusted life years. The cost-utility analysis will report incremental cost per quality-adjusted life years gained. Participant and service provider perspectives will be explored via telephone interviews, and exploratory mixed methods process evaluation analyses will focus on mental health, multiple long-term conditions, health inequalities and implementation strategies. Discussion The trial will report whether text messages (with and without cash incentives) can help men to lose weight over 1 year and maintain this for another year compared to a comparator group; the costs and benefits to the health service; and men’s experiences of the interventions. Process analyses with public involvement and service commissioner input will ensure that this open-source digital self-care intervention could be sustainable and scalable by a range of NHS or public services.

Keywords
Randomised controlled trial; Men with obesity; Text messages; Financial incentives; Weight management; Health inequalities; Process evaluation; Cost-effectiveness

Notes
Additional co-authors: Graeme MacLennan, Matthew David McDonald, Michelle McKinley, Rebecca Skinner, Martin Tod, and Katrina Turner,

Journal
Trials: Volume 23, Issue 1

StatusPublished
Publication date31/12/2022
Publication date online31/07/2022
Date accepted by journal01/07/2022
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/34535
PublisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
eISSN1745-6215

People (5)

People

Dr Stephan Dombrowski
Dr Stephan Dombrowski

Honorary Senior Research Fellow, Psychology

Professor Pat Hoddinott
Professor Pat Hoddinott

Chair in Primary Care, NMAHP

Professor Kate Hunt
Professor Kate Hunt

Professor, Institute for Social Marketing

Dr Lisa Macaulay
Dr Lisa Macaulay

Trial Manager, NMAHP

Ms Claire Torrens
Ms Claire Torrens

Research Fellow, NMAHP