Article

Response to a novel, weight self‐awareness plan used in a multi‐component lifestyle intervention programme to reduce breast cancer risk factors in older women – secondary analysis from The ActWELL trial

Details

Citation

Zaremba SMM, Stead M, McKell J, O'Carroll RE, Mutrie N, Treweek S & Anderson AS (2022) Response to a novel, weight self‐awareness plan used in a multi‐component lifestyle intervention programme to reduce breast cancer risk factors in older women – secondary analysis from The ActWELL trial. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.13062

Abstract
Background The ActWELL RCT assessed the effectiveness of a weight management programme delivered by volunteer lifestyle coaches (LC) in women attending breast clinics. The intervention focused on caloric intake and physical activity, utilising behavioural change techniques including a weight awareness plan (WAP). The current work is a secondary analysis of the ActWELL data and aims to examine the response to the weight self-awareness plan (used as part of the intervention programme). Methodology The LCs invited participants (n=279) to undertake an implementation intention discussion to formulate a self-weighing (SW) plan. Bodyweight scales were offered, and recording books provided. The PA intervention focused on a walking plan assessed by accelerometers. The LCs contacted participants by telephone monthly and provided personalised feedback. Mann-Whitney tests and chi-squared analysis were used to examine the effect of SW on weight change. A qualitative evaluation utilising semi-structured interviews was also undertaken. Results Most participants (96.4%) agreed to set a weekly SW goal and 76 (27%) requested scales. At 12 months, 226 (81%) returned for follow up. The median (IQR) weight change for those who self- reported at least one weight (n=211) was -2.3kg (-5.0, 0.0) compared to -1.2kg (-5.0, 0.03) in those who did not (n=14). Participants who reported weights on >8 occasions (39%) were significantly more likely (p=0.012) to achieve 5% weight loss compared to those who weighed less often. Low numbers of accelerometers were returned which did not allow for significance testing. Qualitative data (n=24) indicated that many participants found the WAP helpful and motivating. Principal Conclusion Greater adherence to the WAP initiated by volunteer coaches is associated with achieving 5% weight loss.

Keywords
Nutrition and Dietetics; Medicine (miscellaneous)

Notes
Output Status: Forthcoming/Available Online

Journal
Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

StatusIn Press
FundersChief Scientist Office
Publication date online31/07/2022
Date accepted by journal13/07/2022
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/34512
PublisherWiley
ISSN0952-3871
eISSN1365-277X

People (2)

People

Miss Jennifer McKell
Miss Jennifer McKell

Research Fellow 1, Institute for Social Marketing

Professor Ronan O'Carroll
Professor Ronan O'Carroll

Professor, Psychology

Research centres/groups

Research themes