Article

Are E-cigarettes associated with postpartum return to smoking? Secondary analyses of a UK pregnancy longitudinal cohort

Details

Citation

Orton S, Taylor L, Laing L, Lewis S, Ussher M, Coleman T & Cooper S (2022) Are E-cigarettes associated with postpartum return to smoking? Secondary analyses of a UK pregnancy longitudinal cohort. BMJ Open, 12 (4), Art. No.: e061028. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2022-061028

Abstract
Objectives Postpartum return to smoking (PPRS) is an important public health problem. E-cigarette (EC) use has increased in recent years, and in a contemporary UK pregnancy cohort, we investigated factors, including ECs use, associated with PPRS. Design Secondary analyses of a longitudinal cohort survey with questionnaires at baseline (8–26 weeks’ gestation), late pregnancy (34–36 weeks) and 3 months after delivery. Setting 17 hospitals in England and Scotland in 2017. Participants The cohort recruited 750 women who were current or recent ex-smokers and/or EC users. A subgroup of women reported being abstinent from smoking in late pregnancy (n=162, 21.6%), and of these 137 (84.6%) completed the postpartum questionnaire and were included in analyses. Outcome measures Demographics, smoking behaviours and beliefs, views and experience of ECs and infant feeding. Results 35.8% (95% CI 28% to 44%) of women reported PPRS. EC use in pregnancy (adjusted OR 0.34, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.85) and breast feeding (adjusted OR 0.06, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.24) were inversely associated with PPRS, while household member smoking at 3 months post partum was positively associated with PPRS (adjusted OR 11.1, 95% CI 2.47 to 50.2). Conclusion EC use in pregnancy could influence PPRS. Further research is needed to confirm this and investigate whether ECs could be used to prevent PPRS.

Journal
BMJ Open: Volume 12, Issue 4

StatusPublished
FundersNational Institute for Health Research and CRUK Cancer Research UK
Publication date30/04/2022
Publication date online30/04/2022
Date accepted by journal17/03/2022
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/34225
eISSN2044-6055

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People

Professor Michael Ussher
Professor Michael Ussher

Professor of Behavioural Medicine, Institute for Social Marketing