Article

Assessing the feasibility, acceptability and accessibility of a peer-delivered intervention to reduce harm and improve the well-being of people who experience homelessness with problem substance use: the SHARPS study

Details

Citation

Parkes T, Matheson C, Carver H, Foster R, Budd J, Liddell D, Wallace J, Pauly B, Fotopoulou M, Burley A, Anderson I, Price T, Schofield J & MacLennan G (2022) Assessing the feasibility, acceptability and accessibility of a peer-delivered intervention to reduce harm and improve the well-being of people who experience homelessness with problem substance use: the SHARPS study. Harm Reduction Journal, 19 (1), Art. No.: 10. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12954-021-00582-5

Abstract
Background For people experiencing homelessness and problem substance use, access to appropriate services can be challenging. There is evidence that the development of trusting relationships with non-judgemental staff can facilitate service engagement. Peer-delivered approaches show particular promise, but the evidence base is still developing. Methods The study used mixed methods to assess the feasibility, acceptability and accessibility of a peer-delivered, relational intervention to reduce harms and improve health/well-being, quality of life and social functioning, for people experiencing homelessness and problem substance use. Four Peer Navigators were employed to support individuals (n = 68 total, intervention participants). They were based in outreach services and hostels in Scotland and England. Qualitative interviews were conducted with intervention participants, Peer Navigators and staff in services, and observations were conducted in all settings. Quantitative outcomes relating to participants’ substance use, physical and mental health, and quality of the Peer Navigator relationship, were measured via a ‘holistic health check’ with six questionnaires completed at two time-points. Results The intervention was found to be acceptable to, and feasible and accessible for, participants, Peer Navigators, and service staff. Participants reported improvements to service engagement, and feeling more equipped to access services independently. The lived experience of the Peer Navigators was highlighted as particularly helpful, enabling trusting, authentic, and meaningful relationships to be developed. Some challenges were experienced in relation to the ‘fit’ of the intervention within some settings. Among participants there were reductions in drug use and risky injecting practices. There were increases in the number of participants receiving opioid substitution therapy. Overall, the intervention was positively received, with collective recognition that the intervention was unique and highly valuable. While most of the measures chosen for the holistic health check were found to be suitable for this population, they should be streamlined to avoid duplication and participant burden. Conclusions The study established that a peer-delivered, relational harm reduction intervention is acceptable to, and feasible and accessible for, people experiencing homelessness and problem substance use. While the study was not outcomes-focused, participants did experience a range of positive outcomes. A full randomised controlled trial is now required to assess intervention effectiveness.

Keywords
Homelessness; Substance use; Drugs; Alcohol; Feasibility; Peer support; Harm reduction; Mixed methods; Intervention

Notes
This project was funded by the Health Technology Assessment Programme (project number 16/153/14) and is now published in full in the Health Technology Assessment online journal [volume 26, and issue number 14, February 2022) and available here https://www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.uk/hta/WVVL4786#/abstract Further information on the project is available at: https://www.journalslibrary.nihr.ac.uk/programmes/hta/1615314/#/ This report presents independent research commissioned by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The views and opinions expressed by authors in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NHS, the NIHR, MRC, CCF, NETSCC, the HTA programme or the Department of Health

Journal
Harm Reduction Journal: Volume 19, Issue 1

StatusPublished
Publication date31/12/2022
Publication date online28/02/2022
Date accepted by journal07/12/2021
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/33934
PublisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
eISSN1477-7517

People (9)

People

Professor Isobel Anderson
Professor Isobel Anderson

Professor, Housing Studies

Dr Hannah Carver
Dr Hannah Carver

Lecturer in Substance Use, Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology

Dr Maria Fotopoulou
Dr Maria Fotopoulou

Senior Lecturer, Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology

Professor Catriona Matheson
Professor Catriona Matheson

Professor in Substance Use, Faculty of Social Sciences

Professor Tessa Parkes
Professor Tessa Parkes

Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences

Professor Bernadette Pauly
Professor Bernadette Pauly

Honorary Professor, Faculty of Social Sciences

Dr Tracey Price-Allan
Dr Tracey Price-Allan

Research Fellow, Sociology, Social Policy & Criminology

Mr Joe Schofield
Mr Joe Schofield

Research Fellow, Faculty of Social Sciences

Mr Jason Wallace
Mr Jason Wallace

Honorary Research Fellow, Faculty of Social Sciences

Projects (1)