Article

Assessment of marine gill disease in farmed atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in chile using a novel total gross gill scoring system: A case study

Details

Citation

Fridman S, Tsairidou S, Jayasuriya N, Sobolewska H, Hamilton A, Lobos C, Houston RD, Rodger H, Bron J & Herath T (2021) Assessment of marine gill disease in farmed atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) in chile using a novel total gross gill scoring system: A case study. Microorganisms, 9 (12), Art. No.: 2605. https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms9122605

Abstract
Gill disorders have become more prevalent and widespread in finfish aquaculture in recent years. Their aetiology is often considered to be multifactorial. Effective diagnosis, control and prevention are hindered by the lack of standardised methodologies to characterise the aetiological agents, which produce an array of clinical and pathological presentations. The aim of this study was to define a novel gross pathological scoring system suitable for field-based macroscopic assessment of complex or multifactorial gill disease in farmed Atlantic salmon, using samples derived from a gill disease outbreak in Chile. Clinical assessment of gross gill morphology was performed, and gill samples were collected for qPCR and histology. A novel total gill scoring system was developed, which assesses gross pathological changes combining both the presumptive or healed amoebic gill disease (AGD) and the presence of other types of gill lesions. This scoring system offers a standardised approach to characterise the severe proliferative pathologies in affected gills. This total gill scoring system can substantially contribute to the development of robust mitigation strategies and could be used as an indicator trait for incorporating resistance to multifactorial gill disease into breeding goals.

Keywords
multifactorial gill disease; diagnostics; Salmo salar; gill health

Journal
Microorganisms: Volume 9, Issue 12

StatusPublished
FundersScottish Aquaculture Innovation Centre and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council
Publication date31/12/2021
Publication date online31/12/2021
Date accepted by journal30/11/2021
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/33785
eISSN2076-2607

People (2)

People

Professor James Bron
Professor James Bron

Professor, Institute of Aquaculture

Dr Sophie Fridman
Dr Sophie Fridman

Post Doctoral Research Fellow, Institute of Aquaculture