Meeting Abstract

Smoking in the social environment and adolescent brand awareness: Differential effects by gender

Details

Citation

Haseeni F, Best C, Murray S, Ozakinci G, Currie D, van der Sluijs W, Eadie D, Stead M, MacKintosh AM, Pearce J, MacGregor A, Amos A, Frank J & Haw S (2016) Smoking in the social environment and adolescent brand awareness: Differential effects by gender. 14th International Congress of Behavioral Medicine "Behavioral Medicine: Making an Impact in the Modern World", Groningen. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 23 (Supplement 1), pp. S196-S197, Art. No.: O607.

Abstract
Introduction: Although tobacco control policies in the UK have limited young people’s exposure to smoking and tobacco products, many young people continue to be exposed to smoking in their social environments. Smoking by friends and family members influences smoking uptake, which may be mediated through increased brand awareness. In this study we examined how young people’s social environments influence young people’s awareness of tobacco brands. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of pupils (11-18yrs) in four Scottish high schools. Using adjusted logistic regression, we examined the association between recall of tobacco brands smoked by members of young people’s social circles and their relationship to the young people. Analysis was restricted to those pupils who had a mother, father, eldest brother, eldest sister, best friend, or boyfriend/girlfriend who smoked (n=1584/3808). Results: 33% (n=522) of students with smokers in their social circles recalled at least one tobacco brand. For boys, only paternal smoking (OR 1.29, 95% CI 1.09-1.54) increased likelihood of brand recall. However, for girls, maternal (OR 2.94, 95% CI 1.99-4.33), paternal (OR 1.63 95% CI 1.11-2.40), and best friend (OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.11-2.22) smoking were all associated with greater probability of the recall of at least one brand. Conclusions: For boys, paternal smoking is the only influence, but for girls influences are wider, with maternal smoking the strongest. This suggests that smoke-free homes should be promoted not only to reduce the adverse health effects of second-hand smoke but also as part of a wider prevention strategy to reduce the uptake of smoking.

Journal
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Volume 23, Issue Supplement 1

StatusPublished
Publication date31/12/2016
Date accepted by journal01/11/2016
ISSN1070-5503
Conference14th International Congress of Behavioral Medicine "Behavioral Medicine: Making an Impact in the Modern World"
Conference locationGroningen

People (4)

People

Dr Catherine Best
Dr Catherine Best

Lecturer Statistician, Health Sciences Stirling

Ms Anne Marie MacKintosh
Ms Anne Marie MacKintosh

Senior Researcher, Institute for Social Marketing

Professor Gozde Ozakinci
Professor Gozde Ozakinci

Professor in Health Psychology, Psychology

Ms Martine Stead
Ms Martine Stead

Deputy Director of ISM, Institute for Social Marketing