Article

'Having come to university my care was very much in my hands': exploration of university students’ perceptions of health care needs and services using the common-sense model of self-regulation

Details

Citation

Rogowsky R, Laidlaw A & Ozakinci G (2020) 'Having come to university my care was very much in my hands': exploration of university students’ perceptions of health care needs and services using the common-sense model of self-regulation. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 43 (6), pp. 943-955. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10865-020-00147-0

Abstract
The health care needs and service experiences of higher education students require more research attention, given the increase in students who have a long-term illness, medical condition, or disability (“condition”). It is also important to consider the experiences of rising numbers of international students. This exploratory qualitative study used face-to-face interviews and the common-sense model of self-regulation to investigate students’ perceptions and coping behaviours, in a higher education institution in the UK. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Twenty students who self-identified as having a condition were interviewed. This study adds depth to the understanding of the connections between students’ health-related experiences and their personal, academic, and post-graduation aspirations and the support needs of students, including international students. To optimise institutional support, innovations in partnerships with local care organisations and within the university, staff training about conditions, peer mentorship, and information outreach especially to international students, should be considered.

Keywords
Symptom reporting; Health care use; Health care seeking; University students; Qualitative research

Journal
Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Volume 43, Issue 6

StatusPublished
FundersUniversity of St Andrews
Publication date31/12/2020
Publication date online26/03/2020
Date accepted by journal17/03/2020
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/33606
ISSN0160-7715
eISSN1573-3521

People (1)

People

Professor Gozde Ozakinci
Professor Gozde Ozakinci

Professor in Health Psychology, Psychology