Article

Ageing consumers and e-commerce activities

Details

Citation

Rybaczewska M & Sparks L (2021) Ageing consumers and e-commerce activities. Ageing and Society. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0144686X20001932

Abstract
Technology, and particularly the internet, has transformed consumer and business behaviours. An ageing population is impacted by these contextual and operational changes. Understanding these impacts within an ageing population is important for businesses, organisations and individuals, and their e-commerce activities. Our study increases understanding about the online behaviour of older consumers. Our research question is: what is the impact of age and individual and household characteristics on the online behaviour of older consumers? This is important given the increasing assumption that all consumers are digitally enabled. We use data from the first wave of an innovative longitudinal study in Scotland (HAGIS – Healthy Ageing in Scotland) to explore ageing consumers and e-commerce activities. The United Kingdom (including Scotland) is the world's third largest e-commerce market, thus providing a suitable context. Our findings point to a shifting relationship between ageing consumers and e-commerce activities. Age is related to e-commerce activities but the ‘break-point’ for these activities is older than normally identified in academic and business practice. Sex is not a differentiator of activity but marital status is. Age and the contextual situation impact e-commerce, and have implications for access and capability, and link to questions over isolation. Important issues are raised for business and organisational practice, around service and other delivery for older people.

Keywords
ageing; e-commerce; internet; Scotland; customers

Notes
Output Status: Forthcoming/Available Online

Journal
Ageing and Society

StatusIn Press
Publication date online31/01/2021
Date accepted by journal01/12/2020
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/32309
ISSN0144-686X
eISSN1469-1779

People (1)

People

Professor Leigh Sparks
Professor Leigh Sparks

Deputy Principal, Marketing & Retail