Letter

Those Apples Don't Taste Like Oranges! Why 'Equalising' HIIT and MICT Protocols Does Not Make Sense

Citation

Vollaard N & Metcalfe R (2021) Those Apples Don't Taste Like Oranges! Why 'Equalising' HIIT and MICT Protocols Does Not Make Sense. Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism, 32 (3), pp. 131-132. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tem.2020.12.002

Abstract
First paragraph: We read with interest the recent article by Andreato entitled ‘High-Intensity Interval Training: Methodological Considerations for Interpreting Results and Conducting Research’ [1]. We applaud the author’s call for greater clarity in defining and reporting high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocols; this is much needed to move the field forward. However, we dispute the author’s principal claim that to avoid bias when comparing HIIT with moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT), it is necessary to ‘equalise’ (match) sessions for energy expenditure (or workload performed, as a proxy for energy expenditure). Upon reading the article, we failed to find any sound justification for this assertion.

Keywords
high-intensity interval training; sprint interval training; moderate-intensity continuous training

Journal
Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism: Volume 32, Issue 3

StatusPublished
Publication date31/03/2021
Publication date online05/01/2021
Date accepted by journal14/12/2020
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/32259
ISSN1043-2760
eISSN1879-3061