Commentary

Does apraxia support spatial and kinematic or mirror neuron approaches to social interaction? A commentary on Binder et al. (2017)

Details

Citation

Reader AT & Candidi M (2019) Does apraxia support spatial and kinematic or mirror neuron approaches to social interaction? A commentary on Binder et al. (2017). Commentary on: Binder, E., Dovern, A., Hesse, M. D., Ebke, M., Karbe, H., Saliger, J., et al. (2017). Lesion evidence for a human mirror neuron system. Cortex, 90, 125e137. https://doi.org/10.1016/ j.cortex.2017.02.008. Cortex, 111, pp. 324-326. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2017.10.018

Abstract
First paragraph: In a recent article in Cortex Binder et al. (2017) present data from 44 left-hemisphere stroke patients with (n = 18) and without (n = 26) apraxia. They tested these patients, alongside healthy controls (n = 19), on three experimental tasks (meaningful gesture recognition, comprehension, and imitation), and two control tasks (control recognition, control comprehension). They also performed a voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping (VLSM) in order to associate lesion locations with experimental task performance in patients. They were specifically interested in examining whether regions associated with the putative human mirror neuron system (MNS) are involved critically, and to a similar degree, in recognising, understanding, and imitating actions.

Journal
Cortex: Volume 111

StatusPublished
FundersEconomic and Social Research Council
Publication date28/02/2019
Publication date online02/11/2017
Date accepted by journal21/10/2017
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/31633
PublisherElsevier BV
ISSN0010-9452
Item discussedBinder, E., Dovern, A., Hesse, M. D., Ebke, M., Karbe, H., Saliger, J., et al. (2017). Lesion evidence for a human mirror neuron system. Cortex, 90, 125e137. https://doi.org/10.1016/ j.cortex.2017.02.008

People (1)

People

Dr Arran Reader
Dr Arran Reader

Lecturer in Psychology, Psychology